Archive for January, 2012

Maritime Shipping and Trade

Monday, January 30th, 2012

The concept of international maritime shipping relies on the continuation of it regular programs, otherwise known as maritime routes. Maritime shipping or transportation follows a great circle distance. Arcs are drawn on the water surface as it is found all over the world. Maritime transportation, because of its physical attributes, is considered geographical.  It also has control strategies and has its own commercial usages.

Maritime transport categories

While a consideration with the geographical attributes is, strategic and especially commercial considerations are much more dynamic. Below are categories of maritime transport based on two criteria:

  1. Cargo bulk and liner shipping along with passenger ferries and cruise ships for carrying passengers.
  2. Shipping of both deep and short sea shipping.

Deep sea transport involves long shipping distances and is normally carried out by ship liners. On the other hand, short sea shipping does not involve crossing an ocean but mostly just river or sea transport. Only a number of bulk, coast and various ferry services qualify in the short sea shipping category.

Disadvantages of shipping as means of trading

When bulk cargo is concerned, the loading and unloading process may even absorb more than a few days of treatment. These disadvantages are principally deterrent in cases where the cargo has to be moved to even a short distance, or when an express service delivery is required. In short, below are two disadvantages of shipping as means of trading:

  1. The pace is somewhat slow.
  2. Delays when the loading and unloading in ports takes place.

When bulk cargo is concerned, the loading and unloading process may even absorb more than a few days of treatment. These disadvantages are principally deterrent in cases where the cargo has to be moved to even a short distance, or when an express service delivery is required.

Ship size and its relevance to trading

Maritime shipping is dominated by fuel, mineral deposits and grains which are bulk cargos. This movement contributes the main energy generation of the world because it helps move the system for developed and transformation of food.

If the ship is bigger, the cost per unit transported would be much lower, that is the principle of economies of scale which is also a primary to the money matters of maritime transportation or shipping. The trend has particularly been evident in containerized and bulk shipping. As a result, the quantity of containerized cargo has grown significantly and the majority of the worldwide trades of man-made goods are now carried in containers, and the common volume measure of the containers is weighed by the twenty-foot equivalent unit, or TEU. Coming from a point of view from a maritime shipper, using larger container ships is a straightforward process as it conveys economies of scale and thus lowers costs per TEU carried.

Maritime Transport and its International aspects

Monday, January 23rd, 2012

Safety, competition, and the environment are some of the very sensitive issues because of their power to influence and effect on the international law that is related to nationwide dominion and the exploitation and development of marine resources.

Maritime transport policies between industrialized and non-industrialized countries

There is a clash of interest between the industrialized countries, which are oriented as a free market and other developing countries which also seek to guard their own maritime markets as is constantly the case with trade and industry issues at international level.

However, it has already been described as the countries that are non-industrialized try to limit the notion of the high seas in so that they could preserve their control over their resources in the widest likely area. The same countries that are non-industrialized also have a tendency to bind their own ports. When these non-industrialized countries also have open registers, they are also passionate defenders against the control of port states since under the last rule. The advantages are substantially reduced after deriving from evading safety and environmental controls.

You could actually eliminate such evasion through the annex, not only of the port state control, but also of the coastal state control to transit ships. The possibility of extending these powers to the high seas has already been dealt with. However at present, port state control only applies to the ships in port, while the coastal state control can only be manifested where there has been an accident or a serious incident.

Rigorous action by the Community will be difficult if its goal is to change the international shipping law, although it could grab the support of most if not all of the countries that are industrialized by promising to have safer and more environmentally friendly shipping. And a risk would be taken: Flags of expediency would also drop one of their most dominant attractions. But then again, it should also be put to thought that such tactful action has its alternatives, like by not complying with some definite international rules, it might prove to be a strong independent incentive to the improvement of the whole action.

On another context, one that is somewhat commercial, the recommencement of complex transport negotiations is still crucial if you want to avoid a boost in some protectionist measures. This was not really an ample guarantee despite having the parties present when the negotiations were balanced thus making them agreed to limited warning measures.

Maritime Job Sector

Monday, January 16th, 2012

Jobs in the maritime transportation sector have conventionally been confined by a national quota system for the crews on ships listed in the maritime register of a certain country. This means a certain number of maritime jobs must be reserved for a country’s own seafarers. Though, “national quotas” are generally not fixed by certain countries, despite having open registers.

The nature of open registers

When ships relocate to a different country, the jobs of seafarers of the country they transferred from are affected unfavorably. And yet, it is not only employment service that is at risk. Countries with open registers employ those willing to work for lower pay qualified crews. This act alters competition. Preparation standards are also more laidback than those that were laid down in the conventions, and this too unfavorably affects safety precautions.

Effects of “national quotas” on the maritime job sector

Having said that countries with open registers employ those willing to work despite lower pay, young people are no longer interested in working in the maritime sector. Job numbers in the conventional seafaring countries have dropped almost crucially resulting to an erosion of maritime tradition and culture and, even the technical knowledge of the sea.

There is a lack of maritime personnel but then the same situation could broaden to other countries in the future, not just in industrialized countries. This is distressing especially when we consider that technical progress and the growing insistence for a means of safe and environmentally- friendly transport requires the need for better qualified workers.

There is also another link that should be discussed, this time between maritime transport policy and on-training public policy. Professionally, seafarers fall into different categories. In some instances, knowledge on technicalities may be required which cannot be used in other production sectors, while others use the same kind of expertise just as other sectors, such as for operating machinery. Training still needs to be carried out in both cases in institutions that are designed exclusively for seafarers. This is equally essential for other jobs that are carried out under the sea-associated conditions, and not only with the deckhands.

An appropriate level of training is therefore vital to seafarers and to the whole sector. Still, it would be of no use without real service prospects. Also important to the existence of a competitive merchant fleet are well-trained employees. However, its competing factor cannot be based on the rates or even the service, but rather of prime rates for a service that is high quality that is within the principles of a fair transportation policy.

Maritime Watercrafts and the Accidents involved

Monday, January 9th, 2012

The most dangerous activity watercrafts were outlined by the Office of Auxiliary and Boating Safety. It was reported based on the total number of casualties and people injured. Below are the results including figures:

Motorboat

  • Considered to be the riskiest among recreational watercraft
  • 230 deaths due to drowning
  • 104 deaths due to other factors
  • 1,888 deaths in a year
  • 2,220 casualties

Personal watercrafts

  • 982 injuries per year
  • 14 deaths due drowning
  • 53 deaths due to other factors
  • 1,049 casualties

Cabin motorboats

  • 33 deaths due to drowning
  • 20 deaths due to other factors
  • 283 injuries per year

Kayaks and canoes

  • 97 deaths due to drowning
  • 10 deaths due to other causes or factors
  • 93 injuries per year
  • 200 casualties

Pontoon vessels

  • 12 deaths due to drowning
  • 3 deaths due to other factors
  • 112 injuries per year
  • 127 casualties

The watercrafts are not only the ones deliberated because of the mishaps. The bodies of water, where the majority of these accidents occur, were also taken into consideration. Surprisingly, the study states that most of these maritime accidents occur in the following information below:

Ponds, lakes, dams, reservoirs, and even gravel pits

  • 327 deaths
  • 2,409 accidents
  • Annual number of 1,801 injuries

Rivers, creaks, and streams

  • 140 deaths
  • 1,088 accidents
  • 832 injuries each year

Bays, inlets, sounds, and harbors

  • 62 deaths
  • 657 accidents
  • 394 injuries per year

Oceans and gulfs

  • 38 deaths
  • 265 accidents
  • 136 injuries per year

The list goes on. No matter where you are and what vessel you take, accidents are unavoidable. It does not mean that you have to choose. Instead, be mindful of the risks involved because by doing so, you are able to take extra care of yourself and ultimately avoid being part of the statistic.

Philippine Maritime Shipping and Manning Companies Directories – Part 30

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

The list of Philippine Shipping and Manning Companies provided in this article, and their information including their links would help a lot in finding what you need. This list connects to the previous related articles posted in the maritime category. You can subscribe for updates by using your email for free to get instant update about this post.

    • TRANSMED (MANILA) CORP

RM 505 D#A FELISA SYJUCO REMED IOS COR TAFT,MALATE
Phone: 4004448
Fax: 5265167

    • TRANSOCEAN SHIPMANAGEMENT (PHILS) INC

3F FIRST MRITIME PLACE 7458-7460 BAGTIKAN ST SAN ANTONIO VILLAGE MAKATI
Phone: 8981111 TRUNKLINE
Fax: 8981107

    • TRI MARITIME CORP

U351&355 MILE LONG BLDG JAVIER COR AMORSOLO ST MAKATI MAKATI
Phone: 8191113/16/17
Fax: 8191133
email: tri@trimaritime.net

    • TRUE NORTH MARITIME CORPORATION

S-1001 ERMITA CTR BLDG 1350 ROXAS BLVD ERMITA ML
Phone: 5267502 / 5263543

    • TSM SHIPPING (PHILS) INC

1747 DIAN ST PALANAN MAKATI CITY
Phone: 5512808 TO 14
Fax: 5511526/5513285

    • UCO MARITIME SERVICES

RM 703 MANUFACTURER`S BLDG. PLAZA STA. CRUZ MANILA
Phone: 7364581
Fax: 7364581

    • UNICOL MANAGEMENT SERVICES INC

R602 6F GLC BLG.492 TM KALAW ST.COR.A.MABINI ST. ERMITA MANILA
Phone: 521-2589/ 522-3371
Fax: 5223371
eMail: admin@unicols.com
WebSite: www.unicolship.com

    • UNISEA PHILIPPINES INC

2/F 3F PHILCOX BLDG 172 SALCEDO ST LEGASPI VILL
Phone: 8940851 TO 55 LOC.100-1
Fax: 8934220

    • UNITED PHILIPPINE LINES INC

UPL BLDG STA CLARA ST INTRAMUROS MANILA
Phone: 5277491 TO 94/5279721
Fax: 5271603/ 3380087
email: mailadmin@uplines.net


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