Archive for November, 2011

Maritime Standards and Classification

Monday, November 28th, 2011

The nation’s marine structures which carry their country’s flags have to meet a certain level of standard regarding maritime leads. The construction of ships and other kinds of sea vessels like watercrafts including the structures that range from land to sea will go through a regulatory assessment by this non-government classification association called, the “Class”.

The “Class”

This is a non-government structured community of people who is in control of the regulations that need to be established and recognized legally. This assessment on frequent events will help in establishing a concrete consistency in the construction and organization of water vessels and offshore structures.

The codes of practice that are legally recognized are established by the Maritime society. These regulations make up the act of processing or constructing and categorizing the water vessels and the structures for offshore purposes. Below are the recognized codes of practice:

  1. Draw on the seafaring architects for intense evaluation.
  2. Utilize the expertise of ship surveyors, and a whole wide selection of different marine engineers.
  3. Hire experts to supervise and oversee the building of structures including repairs.
  4. Conduct authorized surveying of the ships to confirm or make certain that the level of quality is correctly met.
  5. Regulate structures with regards to quality and design. This is applicable to all types of vessels in order to promote safety, stability including orderly and clean emissions.
  6. Agree on technical requirements, calculation checks and design supervision to make sure that the rules are being regulated.

Roles of qualified employees

Employees that are qualified to take on the checking up on the structures, mainly the ships, are dispatched to guarantee that all standards are continuously sustained. In addition, below are the following responsibilities:

  1. They are required to check on the whole commissioning and construction including assessment of vessels.
  2. Take charge of the surveying of oil the rigs, the platforms, and other structures for offshore. This classification process comprises the propulsion systems, valves, pumps, navigational equipments, and other equipments.

These classification societies are taking place all over the world. Recently, the international Maritime Organization (IMO) has sanctioned some proposed changes to the training standards and watch keeping that was held at a convention in the Philippines.

The Maritime Transport and The Law

Monday, November 21st, 2011

Because of its political importance and nature, maritime transport is subject to extensive official involvement. This is done so that the appropriate bodies would be able to constitute a maritime administration that is genuine, untarnished, and whose power extends not only within its limits, but also beyond national boundaries.

Legal framework in maritime transport policies

Maritime transport is subjected to the rules of domestic, international including the community law governing the following:

  1. The ship has the freedom of navigation that is essentially in agreement not only with the international law rules but also with those of the law of domestics.
  2. The sea is divided into certain zone that is exercised by the coastal states and its limits thereof according to the rights of autonomy.

These rights apply in the officially authorized handling of the ships, crews, the carried goods, and even the people aboard. The legal relations that also handle the rights of ships engaged in maritime transportation are also essential and at the same time in accordance with the policies of national laws.  It also handles the commercial and professional players who are involved that are particular to the sector. This includes the rules of labor law, as well as the mostly votive obligations connected with the maritime transport. Hence, a private law is applied in this area with a special set of rules.

The maritime transport is even subjected to the public authorities which is basically in agreement with the rules of the following laws:

  1. Executive – A rule that determines the responsibilities of the authorities with regards to navigation.
  2. Tax and social security – Rules that makes certain that the requirements commonly applying in other areas are adapted to the  precise requirements and demands of maritime transport.
  3. Public economic law rule – An example of which is the shipbuilding support including competition provided that it is still in accordance with the community, domestic and international law.

The maritime transport is also subject to industrial and proficient qualifications as well as the inspection of the demeanor of seafarers in the interests of the public safety of goods and even environmental protection. These set of laws have been developed primarily at an international, domestic, and Community level.

The Rundown on Maritime Economics

Monday, November 14th, 2011

Transportation through the oceans is a one of the key catalysts of trade, expansion and prosperity globally. The intricate mechanism of a maritime economist is connected to the movement of the world economy. Hence, the start of what would be now called Maritime Economics. This was an idea created by Hercules Haralambides of Erasmus University in Rotterdam.

What is Maritime Economics?

It is the holistic and integrated study of ocean shipping or transportation, the management of global supply chains, and port and terminal management. It is with maritime economics that the term maritime logistics was taken from which focuses on the combined optimization of liner shipping networks and container terminals.
Maritime economics focuses on the study of service production and product manufacturing in the maritime industry.  It is committed to budding an understanding of the dynamics of economic activities in the maritime industry and in explaining the factors affecting the demand and supply of those activities. The maritime industry has different types of economic activities that range in different categories; Sea-based and land-based.

Sea-based categories

•    Shipping
•    Production of offshore and gas exploration
•    Aquaculture
•    Fishery

Land-based category

•    Ship repairs
•    Shipbuilding
•    Handling of the cargo
•    Port operations

Port operations cover logistics support services and other subsidiary services like naval architecture, finances, legal review, crewing classification, and equipment/product development.

Maritime industry is important because the seas are also a great transportation-provider, and is one huge source of protein and activity. The sea also aids business activities that produce employment and create positive fiscal effects to a country.

Maritime economics in a maritime nation

Malaysia, bordered and dependent on its seas to facilitate most of their economic activities and trade, may be considered as a maritime nation. The country draws its hydrocarbon energy resources and most of its protein source from the seas. It also harnesses a location that is strategic because it is along chief trade lanes and has world class ports. Malaysia also generates profits coming from marine tourism by the promotion of various activities such as cruising, diving, and boating at the same time developing island resorts.

There is no world body that oversees or guides the maritime economic activities. However, The International Maritime Organization or the United Nations organization that promotes and shoulders responsibility for safe and clean seas, makes certain that the maritime economic activities are continued and brought out in a systematically sustainable manner. They accomplish this through a range of International Maritime Organization conventions that govern the said activities such as shipping, operations undergoing in the port, and shipbuilding.

Philippine Maritime Shipping and Manning Companies Directories – Part 28

Monday, November 7th, 2011

The list of Philippine Shipping and Manning Companies provided in this article, and their information including their links would help a lot in finding what you need. This list connects to the previous related articles posted in the maritime category.

STRAHLMANN SHIPPING SERVICES PHILS INC

7TH FLR 2053 BUILDING EDISON ST MAKATI CITY SAN ISIDRO MAKATI
Phone: 8872493
Fax: 8872495
email: ssspi@strahlmann.com

SUNBRIGHT MARITIME SERVICES, INC.

1120-A PRES QUIRINO AVE MALATE MANILA MALATE MANILA
Phone: 5215174/4012084
Fax: 5215174

SUNRISE MANNING AGENCY, INC.

R402&403 DNA FELISA SYJUCO, REMEDIOS COR TAFT AVE MANILA
Phone: 5211647/ 5362944
Fax: 5211647

SUPER MANNING AGENCY INC

U301 (RM1&2) & 302 DON ALFONSO COND.1108 UN AVE ERMITA MANILA
Phone: 5221711/4000015/ 5247359
Fax: 5240289
email: smai@info.com.ph

SUPERSHIP MARINE SERVICES INC

4410 CALATAGAN STREET PALANAN MAKATI
Phone: 5518140 / 5518151/ 551818
Fax: 8310797
eMail: ssmsmnl@greendot.com.ph

SUPPLY OILFIELD & MARINE PERSONNEL SERVICES, INC.

19-M3&M4 19F PEARLBNK CTR.146 VALERO SALCEDO VILLAGE MAKATI
Phone: 8178919
Fax: 810-0580
eMail: HR-OPE@sos.com.ph
WebSite: sos.com.ph

SWEDISH CREWING MANAGEMENT INC. FOR: NORDIC ORIENTAL MART. INC.

3F FIRST MARITIME PLACE 7458- 7460 BAGTIKAN ST SAN ANTONIO VILLAGE MAKATI
Phone: 8981111
Fax: 8981149
email: ptcgen@webquest.com

TARA TRADING SHIPMANAGEMENT, INC.

SEC E (11F) & D (14F) R MAGSAYSAY BLG 1680 R BLVD MALATE MANILA
Phone: 5268198 / 5281610 TO 13
Fax: 5267774
eMail: ttsm@i-manila.com.ph
website: www.taratrading.com

TASK AGENCIES INC

RM.901 902 903 L & S BLDG 1414 ROXAS BLVD MANILA
Phone: 5210523 / 5252380
Fax: 5214220/3021527
eMail: ujl.ships@taskagencies.com

 

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