Archive for July, 2011

Maritime Ports and Transports

Monday, July 25th, 2011

Maritime transports have land-based foundations that are called ports. It is in ports where ships come in and where the people unload and load the good. It is also where all the route-finding needs are provided for.

Significance of ports in the economy

Ports are the common boundaries for types of maritime transport. But even so, ports also face rivalry that is slowly increasing and consequently, those that present an inferior service are being disregarded in the market. Ports are also the boundaries for maritime transport together with other economic sectors. The maritime industry is depended by coastal regions, wherein it is influenced by a local port’s efficiency. Ports supply a vital connection that links the rest of the world with goods and people.

Ports and its policies

A policy on ports has been proposed by the commission and its main aim is to promote efficiency around ports with its ability to operate together. A transparency in port charges amongst ports is required as a rule in the competition. Thus, maritime transport costs are directly affected. The charges should be proportionate with the provided services, as recommended by the Commission. The overall price also has to be specified clearly. Short sea shipping is also concentrated, thus making it more affected by the port charges.

One policy that is intended for the prevention of having one port charge less than its marketplace opponent is the state aid transparency. There has to be a healthy and fair competition between different proprietors thus eliminating the chance to monopolize the market.

As regards to one of the transportation networks, these policies are being identified as being part of the Community network guidelines which lays down some firm conditions that relates to the compliance of common interested projects. Their function could be the stipulation of sea or river access to ports, which links inside the port area and connected to other network essentials. Easier transshipment should be its aim, in all attempts to reduce traffic blocking on land and external costs that are also generated by European transport. One of the aims is to strengthen trade and industry along with its social consistency. It has to supply lasting admittance to some ports that are generally blocked by ice during the winter; ports that are being located at 60 degrees north. Integrating traffic is one of its additional aims, either in a multimodal chain or a transport network or, or even to develop a transport that has non-polluting means.

Jones act and Maritime employees

Monday, July 18th, 2011

The employer needs to take responsibility by ensuring the protection of everyone aboard the vessel. One of the US maritime laws that have been developed to make certain that every water vessel member of a crew is safeguarded and whose interest is also protected. This applies to grave injuries that an employee may get because of an employer’s negligence. If an employer cannot supply the correct equipment or imply the right safety measures, it may expose the people who work on board any type of water vessel to even higher risks of personal injury; worse, DEATH.

The Jones Act

Signed into law on March 2, 1917, the Jones-Shafroth Act or famously known as the Jones Act which is a scope for people who work on a water vessel. This law makes sure that employees every employee, from crewmen to the captain, will have complete coverage of the compensation if by any chance he faces injury or death because of the negligence of the employer. Take note that not all employees are covered so below is a list of those who are generally considered as workers:

  • Seamen
  • Sailors
  • Fishermen
  • cruise ship workers
  • ferry boat workers
  • tug boat workers
  • barge workers
  • oil platform workers
  • construction workers of vessels and barges
  • commercial divers

The Jones Act does not distinguish any small cases or employee just because of your ranking. This law applies to everyone even if you are part of the deckhand, or even a janitor. Even if you work on board barges, tour boats, commercial vessels or cruise ships, you are still protected by this certain law. This law even protects those who work in lake-traveling water vessels.

Coverage of the Jones Act

Some of the damages that are going to be covered by this law are vocational and occupational reinstruction, medical costs, wages, and even physical and psychological pain. The Jones law may also specifically cover the past and future costs and wage losses, including but not limited to the following:

  1. Compensation for wages lost due to an accident.
  2. Compensation for usual and customary charges related to medical care.
  3. Coverage on costs for food and lodging.

Serious injuries or illnesses can hinder a person’s capability to work, so it is worth noting the future outcome of the damage rather than the damage itself. If it reaches to that level, the employee is entitled to compensation for loss of earning capacity or employment. But it has to be justified that the injury was caused by the employer’s negligence.

Any employer of a person who works on board a sea vessel must make certain that the ships working conditions are safe and any member of the ship’s crew is not exposed to any future fatality. The Jones Act states that any employer has to take much protective measures. Ample safety gears must be provided if accidents and injuries are to be prevented.

And yet, under this law, it is also stated that when a person is injured due to their fellow crew member’s negligence, that employee shall be also protected by the law.

Boating accidents, cruise line mishaps and the maritime law

Monday, July 11th, 2011

Passenger boating accidents and injuries happen most almost every day. Imagine yourself injured in the middle of an ocean during your most precious cruise line vacation, what do you do? Admit it or not, you don’t. For sure there’s 911 if you get injured in a traffic accident but in the sea is a different story. The laws on land may not necessarily be applicable when you are in the sea. Therefore, it is important to know and understand the maritime laws regarding serious injuries when you get injured whether you are on a vacation, cruise line or simply on a boating trip.

A brief idea of the maritime law

To show liabilities in a boating accident, a legal analysis is presented. Take note that this analysis shall cover up the principals of maritime law. Below is an example:

The machinist is primarily responsible for the damages when a tourist is seriously injured. Yet, little did we know that the operator of the vessel is responsible for the safety of the passengers. If legal analysis proves that the failure of the operator of the vessel to comply with his/her responsibility has been the cause of the passenger’s injuries, he/she faces the consequences of this negligence.

Maritime law and its advantages

If you think being on a luxurious cruise ship is safe, think again! Whether you are in the middle of the sea or just about to board the ship from the port, your exposure to different kinds of risks are unavoidable. What could be worse than catching a fire inside a ship? Hitting another offshore vessel or an iceberg, take your pick. Accidents may also happen inside a ship or a vessel. Assaults, whether general or sexual in nature, are risks encountered aboard the ship that may be committed by any staff or other passengers.

Knowing your right is important. Being aware of the maritime law allows you to explore options of filing a lawsuit. It is not just about demanding for compensations but a way to make vessel operators and owners to be more responsible in the safety of their passengers. This also prevents previous accidents, injuries – worst, fatalities from happening again making passenger safety a priority.

Philippine Maritime Shipping and Manning Companies Directories – Part 24

Monday, July 4th, 2011

The list of Philippine Shipping and Manning Companies provided in this article, and their information including their links would help a lot in finding what you need. This list connects to the previous related articles posted in the maritime category. You can subscribe for updates by using your email for free to get instant update about this post.

    • SEA SUNSHINE SHIPPING INC.

3F DELGADO BLDG. 637 BONIFACIO DRIVE PORT AREA MANILA
Phone: 4006030/ 3019462
Fax: 4001013

    • SEA WORKFORCE MANILA CORPORATION

S15, 24,25 &32, G/F, MIDLAND PLAZA M ADRIATICO ERMITA MANILA
Phone: 5265259/ 5239529
Fax: 5227465

    • SEA WORLD MARITIME CORPORATION

2F,3F & 4F, SWMC BLDG 124-126 SINCIEGO ST PASAY CITY
Phone: 5264331 to 33
Fax: 521-7386
email: swmc@pldtdsl.net

    • SEABIRD SHIP MANAGEMENT, INC.

3/F F&C BLDG. 2110 GIL PUYAT AVE., PASAY
Phone: 8328235/ 8328237
Fax: 8328237

    • SEABOUND MARITIME SERVICES INC

RM.302 3/F,1526 P.SANTOS ST COR EDSA PASAY CITY
Phone: 750-1348/8340632
Fax: 8340635
eMail: seabound.globe.com.ph

    • SEABREEZE CREWING (MANILA) INC

SUITE 202 ALCCO BLG, ORTIGAS AVENUE GREENHILLS SAN JUAN
Phone: 7271167
Fax: 7269144
email: w.bate@seabreeze.com

    • SEACREST MARITIME MANAGEMENT INC

S25C&D,25F RUFINO PACIFIC TWR,6784AYALA &VA RUFINO LEGASPI VILLAGE MAKATI
Phone: 8911946/891-1947/891194
Fax: 8911946
eMail: info@seacrestmaritime.com
WebSite: www.seacrestmaritime.com

    • SEAFARERS SHIPPING AGENCY INC

RCM BLDG 1418 SAN MARCELINO ST ERMITA MANILA
Phone: 521-1566/67
Fax: 5215207

    • SEAHOUSE FISHERY AND AQUATIC RESOURCES INC

RM.224 EBC BLDG ORTIGAS AVE GREENHILLS SAN JUAN
Phone: 7214191/94
Fax: 7219366

 


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