Archive for August, 2010

What they don’t want you to know about Fire Extinguishers

Monday, August 16th, 2010

Do you ever ask yourself why different fire extinguishers exist onboard the ship? Let us give you new insights about fire extinguishers and its uses.

There are many types of ships that need different upkeep and regulations depending on the size and number of crew it can hold. If you are looking to spend some time with a job on the sea, you could find yourself on an oil rig, bulk carrier, oil tanker, Ro-Ro fleet, freight vessel, passenger carrier, or a cargo vessel.

You’ve probably noticed that ships are built to be watertight; they must rely on a mechanical means of ventilation. If it were not for the air-conditioning and ventilation found on a ship, the passengers would not be able to ride comfortably below the decks. But when there is a fire on these vessels, these ventilation systems can spread the smoke and gases to all parts of the ship causing death to many.

Keeping the crew, passengers and belongings safe from fire needs a plan of action and the right fire safety tools such as fire extinguishers. All members of the crew should be aware of fire extinguisher signs and the practices included in fire safety and well versed in the use of the fire safety tools on board.

Anyone who works onboard the ship will tell you that fire extinguishers nearby is a must and a welcome sight for passengers to feel safe.

Electrical fires on a ship are more common than other types of fires. The equipment used on a ship is subject to more wear and tear than electrical equipment used on land. Because of this all electrical cables should be consistently checked to ensure there are no breakages, cuts, abrasions or a possibility of being immersed in water.

If one of these occurs , immediate steps are taken to fix the situation in the safest possible way. Watch for sparks from anywhere there is electrical equipment being used if repairs are being done, make sure they are done correctly and not such as a “Jury-rig” job, which only results in losses of life and property. When doing work make sure you shut of the power from the main electrical box and put up a sign alerting others there is work in progress and for no power to put back on until further notice.

We don’t cut corners.

Wear proper protection when doing any electrical work and follow all the safety steps in the manuals for protecting yourself as best you can from shock or other mishaps. It is recommended to use CO2 fire extinguishers on electrical fires as they work quickly, effectively and do not leave such a big mess as other dry chemical solutions may. Each fire extinguisher while similar in design and use, serves a distinct job for differing classes of fires. Hold regular training sessions with your crew to ensure they know how to keep and regulate the fire safety tools you will have on board.

The Smart Choice.

Have extra equipment such as fire suppression blankets available or any other extinguishing devices that may be used by passengers as well in case of emergency.
Talking to a professional from a marine fire safety shop, research online, or talk to a boating specialist. Especially if you’re new to owning, running or working on a ship and do not know the best types of fire safety devices to keep onboard.
Share this information or bookmark it. You can help spread the knowledge about fire extinguishers.

Fire Extinguishers – 3 Key Steps to Keeping Your Ship Safe From Fire

Thursday, August 5th, 2010

Fire is one of the most dangerous killers that we have known to encounter. Whether there is a fire on land or at sea, the only way to protect yourself is by knowing the right safety equipment to use and exactly how to use it.

Fire extinguishers have been around since the early 1800’s and have seen several improvements from many different chemists and inventors throughout all areas of the world. Understanding the different fire extinguisher signs also promotes the awareness of the crew on the proper use of fire extinguisher.

The fire safety tools as they are now known have become the best piece of firefighting equipment you can buy. One of the benefits of these types of firefighting tools is that they can be used both on land and at sea.
<br//>In the following article, you will find 3 key steps to keeping your ship safe from fire.

If you are a crew member on a large ship, there will need more tools, leg work and skills than for a smaller ship. You will need to make sure there are oxygen masks available for if running up and down decks with a hose will be necessary. While fire extinguishers may come in handy for tiny fires on a ship, they do not necessarily do much good unless contained early.

As there is nowhere safe for passengers and crew to flee to in case of a blaze, Understanding how to catch a fire in it’s infancy and putting it out before anyone dies is critical. This needs quick thinking, quick response time, and the proper education on the use of the tools needed.

With a fire onboard, one of the most important steps is to call for outside help. The Coast Guard or the Navy should be available to come to your rescue if an evacuation is necessary. Everyone must abandon the ship unless you are a trained firefighter.

The less people are on board, the more space there will be for firefighters to move quickly and smoothly without interference. Time is of the essence when on a ship. Fires on ships take as many lives as a shipwreck.

If you are on a personal boat out with your family, you must have the right equipment onboard. This includes a radio/cb that has exceptional range so you can call out for help as soon as you need to. You must have flares, water, fire extinguishers that you can use to put out both electrical and flammable liquid fires, a fire suffocation blanket, and an oxygen mask.

Having a fully equipped medical kit would also be a wise decision. Make sure all members understand the proper use of each of the fire safety tools and what do say if calling in an S.O.S to the Coast Guard.

Remember This!

As in all things you do, being prepared on a ship or a boat for fire should just be something you do not have to think twice about. If you want to stay safe, using common sense, taking the time to research, practice and buy the necessary fire safety tools is what is needed to stay alive and safe out in the water.

Having tools such as fire extinguishers on hand for easy reach may mean the difference between catching a fire before it spreads or losing your life and your boat. Take the steps to stay safe and enjoy the experience of life on the water as it was meant to be enjoyed.

Philippine Maritime Shipping and Manning Companies Directories – Part 13

Tuesday, August 3rd, 2010

The list of Philippine Shipping and Manning Companies provided in this article, and their information including their links would help a lot in finding what you need. This list connects to the previous related articles posted in the maritime category. You can subscribe for updates by using your email for free to get instant update about this post.

    • MARIMAR SHIPPING AGENCY CORPORATION

2686 2/F SOUTH AVENUE MAKATI CITY
Phone: 8976364-65/8969962/8908
Fax: 8968720
eMail: gmarimar@pldtdsl.net

    • MARITIME FACTORS INC

S101 MF EASTGATE CTR. BLDG. 169 EDSA MANDALUYONG
Phone: 5337228/ 5333929

    • MARITIME SERVICES & MANAGEMENT INC

1517 F.AGONCILLO ST ERMITA MANILA
Phone: 5219805 / 5212436/521432
Fax: 5212440

    • MARLOW NAVIGATION PHILS INC (FORMERLY CREWSERVE INC)

MARLOW BLDG. 2120 LEON GUINTO ST. MALATE MANILA
Phone: 5369459/5362121
Fax: 4009941
eMail: MAIL@CREWSERVE.COM
website: www.crewserve.com.ph

    • MARSAMAN MANNING AGENCY INC.

G/F & RMS 304-305 TM KALAW CTR 667 TM KALAW ST ERMITA MANILA
Phone: 5671403
Fax: 5671403
eMail: admin@marsaman.com.ph
WebSite: www.marsaman.com.ph

    • MARSUN SHIPPING CORPORATION

3/F DUVAL BLDG 669 AURORA BLVD QUEZON CITY
Phone: 7260806/7274234
Fax: 7474224

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