Archive for January, 2010

The Most Effective Solution in Reducing Ship Squat Effect

Saturday, January 30th, 2010

Various ways adopted by most mariners proves to be effective in reducing ship squat effect. But finding out ship squat effect on its early stage will make it much easier for you to decide your next action to avoid or reduce it. Ship captains commonly apply these procedures and skills listed below. Pilots also help by giving information and maneuvering the ship, considering certain parameters and limits. Let’s discuss the first one.

Lessen the Mean Draft

Lessening the mean draft of the vessel can be achieved by discharging water ballast. The effects of these causes:

  1. The CB (Block Coefficient) to some extent, to lower in value.
  2. On a related water depth, the UKC (under keel clearance) will become higher in value.

Plan Your Route in Deeper Waters

When planning your voyage plan, consider your route on a deeper channel. Select the best possible route that you intend to navigate. Check the tides and current affecting the area in relation to your ETA (estimated time of arrival). Ask more information from agents at destination port if information from books is inadequate.

“the fastest and most efficient way of reducing ship squat is by decrease of speed. It’s still the best choice”

Consider Passing Distances on Objects and Ships

Passing distance on objects and ships is necessary. Confined channel possess danger to large ships. Avoid congested confined channels. The Greater the width of the channel, will lead to less ship squat. Finally, the fastest and most efficient way of reducing ship squat is by decrease of speed. It’s still the best choice.

Consider This…

Understanding the methods listed above would give you enough idea on how to reduce ship squat. As you go deeper in this series of articles you would most probably checked thought of reading other articles in this blog. You can consider posting your comments or retweet this post. I would appreciate it also if you would mention the articles in Pinoy Maritime and link to our site.

The Easiest Way of Understanding Ship Squat Effect

Friday, January 22nd, 2010

Understanding ship squat effect helps reduce the risk of grounding ships. How does international shipping deal with ship squat effect?

With the fast rising economy, industrialized country has continually created large ships navigating in different major ports and channels. Seldom do senior officers on duty know how important “Ship Squat” in shallow waters. Controlling the problems and dangers of ship squat in shallow waters would reduce the risk of getting aground or to a more serious situation.

What is Ship Squat?

While the ship is making way through the water, she pushes large amount of water ahead of her. This water returns to the side and under the ships bottom. Imagine this cycle of water building up speed under the ship causing a drop in pressure. This later causes the ship to vertically drop in the water.

As the ship vertically drops, we can say the ship trims forward or aft. So we can say that, the decrease in the under keel clearance of the ship, either forward or aft is known as Ship Squat. Remember that trim is different from Squat. Trim is the difference of the forward and aft draft while the ship is stationary, while in squat the ship is moving.

Factors that Affects Ship Squat

Bodily sinkage plus Trimming effect comprise ship squat. If the ship is on even keel and not moving, the trimming effect depends on the type of ship and its block coefficient (CB). Let’s give an example on this:

The ship moves forward and gains speed while in shallow water, considering that she has an under keel clearance of 1.0 to 1.5 meters. If she increases her speed, she will most likely have an excessive squat on the forward or the aft.

  • If the ship’s CB is greater than 0.700, the maximum squat would likely occur on the forward part.
  • If its CB is less than 0.700, the maximum squat would most likely occur on the aft part.
  • If CB is almost equal to 0.700, the maximum squat would most likely occur on the forward, amidships, and aft part.

“the decrease in the under keel clearance of the ship, either forward or aft is known as Ship Squat”

The hull shape of ships also affects ship squat. Large ships like OBO and Super tankers commonly squat forward. On the other hand Passenger ships will likely squat on its stern. Assuming they are even keel when non-moving. Let’s consider another example:

The Ship is trimmed by the stern and non-moving. Then she starts moving and creates further trim at her stern. The dynamic trim (while the ship moves) will add to the static trim (while non-moving). Then we can say the maximum squat will occur at the stern.

Open and Confined Channels

Most of the time, this could lead to an open debate between the Master (the captain of the ship) and the Navigating Officer. Depending on how they understand it according to personal interpretation or how it was presented to them. Let’s try to clarify some things about Open and Confined Channels:

  • When a vessel navigates on a channel with no breadth (the width of the channel) restriction, like riverbanks and canals. The ship navigates in an Open Channel.
  • When a vessel navigates on a channel with breadth restriction. The ship navigates in a Confined Channel.

Summarizing all that you’ve learn, would give you an idea of finding the best way in finding out how much your ship squat. Keep in mind that safety of navigation plays an important role in our goal as a watch officer. This series of articles about ship squat effect will be posted here so it is better that you subscribe to my RSS Feed for updates or share some link-love and mention me on your site or bookmark this article.

Philippine Maritime Shipping and Manning Companies Directories – Part 12

Thursday, January 14th, 2010

The list of Philippine Shipping and Manning Companies provided in this article, and their information including their links would help a lot in finding what you need. This list connects to the previous related articles posted in the maritime category. You can subscribe for updates by using your email for free to get instant update about this post.

    • KORPIL SHIPMANAGEMENT AND MANNING CORPORATION (FOR INTER-PACIFIC)

3F PARAGON TOWER 531 FLORES ST
Phone: 5261186 / 89
Fax: 5361185 / 3381813

    • LACERTA SHIPPING AGENCIES PHIL., INC.

U602 DON ALFONSO CONDO #1108 L.GUERRERO/UN ERMITA MANILA
Phone: 4009417/ 4009422
Fax: 5244884

    • LAUREL CARRIERS PHILIPPINES, INC.

701 WSTWOOD CONDO 23 EISENHOWER GHILLS SN JUAN
Phone: 725-4349/7253894/725420
Fax: 3021751

    • LEEWARD MARINE SERVICES INC

RM 201 BARON BLDG II NO 761 JP RIZAL ST MAKATI
Phone: 8903198

    • LEONIS NAVIGATION COMPANY INC

915 PRES.QUIRINO AVE COR LEON GUINTO ST MALATE MLA
Phone: 5238646-50
Fax: 5215177

    • LOS NINOS DEL MAR MARINE SERVICES

RM 2-A 2/F 1828 SN MARCELINO ST MLTE MLA
Phone: 303-0270
Fax: 303-0269
Email: losninosdelmar@yahoo.com

    • LOTUS SHIPMANAGEMENT, INC.

S-AB, TAFT BUS CTR 2157 TAFT AVE MALATE MANILA
Phone: 4002190 / 4002191/ 40021
Fax: 4002193

    • LT MARINE OFFSHORE SERVICES, INC.

RM306A GEDCOR BLDG.IRASAN N.A QUINO AVE.PQUE CITY
Phone: 8206343
Fax: 8206344

    • LYDIA MAR (MANILA) INC

RMS 703 & 705 R. SANTOS BLDG P`ZA LACSON STA CRUZ
Phone: 7344860 / 7344806
Fax: 7344833
Email: lydiamar@i-manila.com.ph

    • M & A MARITIME SHIPPING CO

1202 INT. GEN LUNA ST ERMITA MLA MALATE MANILA
Phone: 528-4931
Fax: 528-4932
Email: engrbacay@yahoo.com

    • MAERSK-FILIPINAS CREWING INC (FOR MAERSK TABACALERA CREWING AGENCY)

51/F PBCOM TOWER NO. 6795 AYALA/HERRERA MKTI
Phone: 8419000 LOC 290
Fax: 8158307

    • MAGSAYSAY MARITIME CORPORATION (FOR MAGSAYSAY MANPOWER INC)

520 TM KALAW ST ERMITA MANILA
Phone: 5269640 / 5210850/526960
Fax: 5259507

    • MAGSAYSAY MITSUI O.S.K MARINE INC.

6/F MAGSAYSAY BLDG 520 TM KALAW ST ERMITA MANILA
Phone: 5268888
Fax: 5248132
Email: cndelacruz@magmol.com

    • MAINE MARINE PHILIPPINES, INC.

A-E 17/F, R.MAGSAYSAY CTR. 1680 ROXAS BLVD. MLA
Phone: 5244973/ 5365455
Fax: 3382719

    • MALAYAN TOWAGE & SALVAGE CORPORATION

RM 101 ERECHEM BLDG SALCEDO & 18/F EQUITABLE LEGASPI VILLAGE MAKATI
Phone: 8183702/ 8130696/ 759217
Fax: 8153517

    • MANILA SHIPMANAGEMENT & MANNING INC

GF ALEXANDER HOUSE 132 AMORSOLO MAKATI CITY
Phone: 8924071 LOC.75
Fax: 8166993

    • MARANAW LUZON SHIPPING COMPANY INC

G/F ENRIQUETA BLDG 1675-1677 A.MABINI ST MALATE
Phone: 5210301 / 3600400

    • MARC-CCI SHIPPING MANAGEMENT INC (FOR MARC-CTI SHPG MNGT INC)

3/F FOREX BLDG 1963 SAN MARCELINO MALATE MLA
Phone: 5238939/5268770/5268772
Fax: 5268771
Email: accounts@marc-ships.com

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